I don't make any commission on these products, and I'm not affiliated with their manufacturers. I'm only trying to keep the most up-to-date list of healthier screen-based products.

Smartphones

Hisense A5
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Hisense A5

Hisense released this budget-friendly (~$185) E Ink smartphone that runs Android 9.0 (no Google Play support). The phone is unlocked, supports English, and works on many carriers. I haven’t used one yet but it’s receiving amazing reviews so far. Here’s a video of it in action, and more information about its features.

Judging from the video, this looks to be by far the best replacement for a modern smartphone and one of the best executed E Ink devices ever made.

Image credit: Notebook Italia (@notebookitalia) on Twitter

Kingrow K1
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Kingrow K1

This is another smartphone with a Android 8.0 but no Google Play support. This one is pricier than the A5 but apparently in production after a successful Kickstarter.

Image credit: Good e-Reader

Light Phone II
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Light Phone II

An intentionally stripped-down E Ink phone promising only the basic tools to eliminate distraction. The company’s Kickstarter campaign was extremely successful and they’ve been very transparent with their backers during production.

Image credit: PCMag.com

E-readers

Anything featuring an E Ink screen, which is most available e-readers including the Kindle, will work well. Models without a front-light would be best.

Tablets/computers

Onyx Boox products
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Onyx Boox products

Onyx is a Chinese computer manufacturer specializing in e-reading devices. Their latest devices are basically E Ink tablets with Android 9.0 and Google Play support. Their prices are comparable to iPads, with smaller 10” models around ~$500 and the largest 13” models (Boox Max 2 & Boox Max 3) around ~$750-$850. I personally use a Boox Max 3 as a laptop replacement with an external mouse and keyboard; it works fairly well though Android’s tablet support is limited. Still, most Android apps run without a hitch, so these devices would likely work well for students.

Image credit: Onyx Boox

Toshiba Portege R500/R600
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Toshiba Portege R500/R600

Toshiba released these two netbooks over 10 years ago with one special characteristic: a “transflective” display, a combination of a normal transmissive LCD and a reflective LCD. There’s a button right above the keyboard to turn the backlight completely off, and with a strong enough light in front (or direct sunlight) it can be used in full reflective mode. They’re usually sold for very cheap (<$150) and work reasonably well but are definitely on the slow side by today’s comparisons. I use the Portege R500 as my personal computer and it’s been absolutely invaluable. These are now very hard to find, but I’ve had luck on eBay and Offerup.

Image credit: Wired

Dell Latitude E6240 XFR
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Dell Latitude E6240 XFR

Similar to the Toshiba netbooks, this is a version of Dell’s Latitude E6240 laptop made for military purposes and featuring the same type of transflective screen. These are rugged, bulky machines, but the screen is larger and the hardwware specs are better than the Toshibas. They’re slightly more expensive at $325 used, but they’re much easier to find. Fair warning: I haven’t used this device so I’m not sure if the backlight can be turned completely off. If someone has used one I’d love to hear how it works.

Image credit: Dell

External monitors

Dasung Paperlike
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Dasung Paperlike

Dasung is a Chinese company that makes HDMI-compatible E Ink computer monitors, and their latest models are fast enough to watch videos. Their Paperlike HD 2019 was the monitor that led to the creation of this website, though it’s quite expensive without the economies of scale of conventional screens. Being E Ink, they’re limited to grayscale but they function very reliably. I’d recommend finding a used Paperlike Pros or HDs on eBay to save on costs.

Image credit: Sol Computer

Onyx Boox Max 2/3
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Onyx Boox Max 2/3

The Onyx Boox Max 2 and Max 3 (mentioned above) both offer HDMI support to use as computer monitors, but reports from buyers trying to use the Max 2 as a computer monitor are overwhelming negative due to the input lag. The Max 3 works fairly well as a monitor, though. In either case, both make good enough E Ink Android tablets to recommend.

Image credit: The eBook Reader Blog

Gaming

Game Boy Advance
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Game Boy Advance

The original Game Boy Advance was one of the last mass-produced color reflective LCDs, with a much improved panel over its predecessor, the Game Boy Color. Serious gamers are probably scoffing at this suggestion, but the Advance is cheap (~$30) and easy to find on sites like Craigslist, Offerup, and eBay.